Nose Injuries – When There Is No Doctor

Injuries to the nose are not uncommon; yet, when they happen, people tend to panic. Instead of letting the situations “lead you by the nose”, follow these simple first-aid measures, and stay in control:

Your nose is not merely an organ of smell. It’s a filter, a temperature controller, a passageway and sometimes even an alarm system. It is closely connected with your eyes, mouth, ears and head, both cosmetically and physically. So, when it is injured, to treat it you’ve got to look beyond your nose.

“In order to treat any injury to the nose, you must first understand the nature and extent of the injury,” say ENT surgeons. “Basically, there are three kinds of injuries: those that involve the nose and the head; those that affect the nose and the face; those that pertain only to the nose. Only after the kind of injury has been ascertained can proper treatment or first aid follow.”

The first two kinds of injuries are usually the result of a violent, perilous impact, like a fall from a great height, or a road accident. When the nose and the head are injured – and such cases are obvious even to a layman – the damage is serious and can occasionally be fatal. In all probability the victim will be unconscious and to render first aid would be impossible. Your only course of action is to rush the victim to a hospital and leave him in the hands of the doctors.

If the head is not hurt, that is, if the injury is only to the front of the face, then check the extent of the damage. Any injury to the eye directly, or even to the area around the eye, will need a doctor’s attention. You can try to control the bleeding of the nose, if there is any, but the person should be taken quickly to the hospital. Probably he will need the attention of the ENT surgeon and the ophthalmologist.

Injury to the nose and to the area around it, that is, the sides and below, could mean damage to the sinuses and upper jaw. Ask the victim to make as if he is biting on something. Difficulty and pain in moving his mouth indicate probable fracture of the upper jaw. In this case, too, though you could try to control the bleeding from the nose, the victim needs medical attention. An ENT surgeon and a dental surgeon may have to work together to repair the damage. Therefore, such a case should be quickly taken to the hospital.

The third type of injury is more commonplace. In this kind of injury, first aid can be given, but again, it will depend upon the cause and nature of the injury. Injuries to the nose can be broadly grouped as: external wounds; fractures; obstruction by foreign objects; bleeding from the nostrils.

EXTERNAL INJURIES

External injuries like abrasions, bruises, cuts and punctures can be treated as you do wounds. Clean the affected area, apply an antiseptic and bandage. Slight abrasions or cuts will heal with adequate care. Deep and extensive wounds should be shown to a doctor.

Fractures of the nose are easily detectable from the distorted shape of the nose, the constant pain and swelling. Fractures have to be splinted and set right, which can only be done by an ENT specialist.

Those with children will b familiar with the third type of nasal injury – that is, blockage of the passage due to insertion of foreign objects into the nose. “” Often, the child may not be aware that he has done something he shouldn’t have, says ENT surgeon. “”So the object remains in the nose for days and is discovered only when infection sets in. then, either the parents notice that the child’s nose is swelling, or the child complains of pain in the nose.”

However, even if you know that the child has pushed something up his nose, don’t try to extricate it yourself. You could push it in even further. Sometimes, lightly blowing the nose helps to dislodge the object. But if the object is edged, it may scrape or bruise the nose and bleeding may result. So it’s safest to take the child to a doctor, preferably an ENT specialist, as he is better equipped to deal with the problem.

NOSE BLEEDS

Nosebleeds or epistaxis can occur due to a number of reasons: Sudden climatic changes; a rise in blood pressure; a traumatic injury; high fever.

The air we breathe in has to be homogenised to the body temperature of 34°C before it reaches the lungs. The nose acts as a temperature controller. If the air is cold, the nose warms it; if the air is too warm, the nose cools it. In order to help it carry out its function, the nose is heavily lined with blood vessels. The supply of blood depends upon the difference in the body and atmospheric temperatures. When the temperature outside changes suddenly, as when we move from a warm climate to a cold place, or vice versa, the demands on the blood vessels can be extensive and, consequently, they are likely to rupture, resulting in a nosebleed.

A rise in blood pressure forces the blood vessels to enlarge and sometimes even burst. Since the capillaries in the nose are fine, they rupture more easily. Thus a nosebleed could be a symptom of hypertension. Also, during plane flights, if cabin depressurisation takes place, the difference in air pressure outside the body and within affects the blood vessels and some passengers could experience bleeding from the nose.

Any trauma inflicted on the nose – say, when you fall while running and hit your nose on the ground, or when a child is hit on the nose by a ball while playing – ruptures the blood vessels inside the nose. Often, in these cases, the bleeding may seem heavy, but if there is no fracture, it may not be grave. However, once you’ve stopped the bleeding, you should get the patient checked by the doctor.

Sometimes the trauma can be light, as when a person digs in too hard to clean the nostrils. In that case, the bleeding stops spontaneously after a few minutes.

A high fever may sometimes be accompanied by a nosebleed. Again, this is because of the nose having to adapt to the difference in temperatures of the body and the air outside. ENT surgeon says, “This is occasionally seen in typhoid cases where the temperature rises very high.”

When bleeding from the nose occurs, you should first prop up the patient. Don’t let him lie flat. If you do that, the blood will rush back and enter the throat making him choke or cough, thus increasing the pressure on his blood vessels and forcing out more blood. “Sometimes the blood that is thus forced back goes into the stomach and the patient then vomits it out through the mouth,” says ENT surgeon. “At such times, everyone panics because the patient has vomited blood. They don’t realise he’s merely throwing out what he has swallowed.”

Ideally the patient should be made to sit up; head bent over a bowl so that the blood can drip down from the nose. Pinch closed the nostrils, letting the patient breathe through his mouth. Often, this stops the bleeding. Or you could put an ice pack on the nose. To make the pack, put some crushed ice in a clean kerchief or cloth and pack it closely over the nose. Use crushed ice, not chunks, because it can be moulded around the nose, and even pressure applied. If ice is not at hand, give the patient a freshly-cut onion, or crushed garlic pods, or ammonium bicarbonate, to smell. The strong odour will repulse his sense of smell, forcing the nostrils to contract, and this stops the bleeding.

NOT SERIOUS

Nosebleeds are generally not serious. “In a normal person, the bleeding stops on its own after about five minutes,” says ENT surgeon. “That it lasts for a long time and that the flow is heavy are only impressions. What happens is that, in the absence of muscles in the nose, the tightly-packed blood vessels cannot contract. So the bleeding continues till clotting sets in. and that normally occurs in about five minutes. But if the bleeding does continue longer, don’t panic. Pinch the nostrils or use an ice pack to stanch the flow, which will happen after a while provided there is no serious damage. However, even if the bleeding stops you should get the injury examined by an ENT specialist to preclude complications later.”

There are millions hits on the internet search drive for Wellness – from mental to physical health, cardiac fitness, cancer, yoga, how to overcome certain ailments such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, stoke, and tips on weight loss and how to grow taller, with many other ideas getting honorable mention. It takes quite a bit of research to find any one site that has so much to offer on all these fronts, let alone one that can combine all the needs for your innermost wellness – joy, bliss and beyond. For wellness’ sake you can stop looking out there, and take some time for yourself, a sort of one-stop-shop: BalancedLifestyleWikipedia.

The Changing Face of Healthcare

Several significant forces in the last several years have been changing the way healthcare has and will continue to be delivered. The emergence of more unique ways to deliver care such as clinics incorporated into businesses and factories, the increased use of mid-level providers (nurse practitioners & physician assistants), the increase integration of technologies such as telemedicine and robotics and the shift from interventional reimbursement to outcomes reimbursement are just a few examples.

Compounding these are the ever-increasing costs of healthcare, the strain of funding Medicare on the U.S. economy, and the complications of insurance and healthcare payments under the affordable care act, ACA.

This has led to changes in how businesses intend to interface with the healthcare system going forward. CVS’s acquisition of Aetna will try to leverage healthcare delivery through their pharmacy structure. United Healthcare’s acquisition of DaVita hopes to leverage cost containment and resource control by directly controlling physicians. And the recently announced collaboration among Berkshire Hathaway, Amazon and J.P. Morgan Chase presents a yet unknown structure whose stated goals is improved quality and less cost. How they will implement their strategy is yet to emerge.

The decline in hospital admission over the last several decades has further led to restructuring by hospital corporations such as Tenet. Premise Health has emerged as a company placing physicians and other healthcare providers directly in corporate/business offices.

The big question then with these new ventures are how do organizations know what works financially and how do they track performance… In other words, how do you track, measure and value the relationships between cost and outcomes?

How can the analyst measure which methods(s) may generate better or best outcomes?

A simple return on investment, ROI, calculation will not provide needed nor valid insights. However, the use of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) would provide quite useful, valid and actionable information. CEA uses decision tree models to compare not only cost outcomes but effectiveness outcomes of various treatments on patient health and even on future healthcare usage based on various current actions. It can further be used to determine how effective a set amount of money spent on a particular treatment or method will impact outcomes (i.e. willingness to pay calculation). CEA models are flexible and can incorporate a wide variety of scenarios. As opposed to Big Data, CEA makes use of Broad Data so that comparisons of treatment modalities can be evaluated using real life outcomes. It can compare effects on a discrete problem such as a cancer tumor, or on chronic ongoing diseases such as COPD or CHF.

As the delivery of effective yet profitable, or at least cost effective, healthcare becomes more challenging, methods for evaluating treatments and programs become more necessary if not essential. Methods must be implemented to evaluate these new treatments and programs once they are in place so adjustments can be made. CEA enable organizations to both initially evaluate and subsequently monitor new methods and programs in a meaningful way.

Know Your Stage of Baldness and Its Recommended Treatment

There are specific stages of male as well as female hair loss and you need to find out what stage of your baldness and then go for a treatment accordingly. In this article, we will cover stages of male hair loss.

Stages of male hair loss and recommended treatment:

Stage 1: Stage one is a normal stage, where there are no visible signs at all, you will only find few hairs fall while combing or washing your hairs.

Treatment: Opt for a high protein diet, give your head scalp a gentle massage every day to improve scalp blood circulation, try to be stress-free

Stage 2: We can say that this is the early stage of baldness, and if you reached this stage, you need to consider taking advice from an expert doctor. You will see a deep loss of hair on top of your head.

Treatment: In this stage, doctor will suggest you a combination of treatment including, derma rolling for improving scalp absorption with Minoxidil and laser hair therapy.

Stage 3: You are just in the stage of acute hair loss or baldness stage. In this stage, you will see a thin line of hair loss area going from one side of your front forehead to the other side creating a bridge like structure; at times the hair loss area Is visible from the top of your head.

Treatment: At this stage, surgeons will suggest to have hair grafts, no more than 3000 to 4000 grafts to cover the area and will advise applying Minoxidil or other related supplements to maintain the growth of non affected areas.

Stage 4: If you click a picture of your head from the top side you might see a horseshoe shape formation of the area and further adding to this you will see an increase in the area from sides of the head.

Treatment: At this stage, expert doctor might advise you to go for hair transplantation from the back of your head where hair growth is good.

Stage 5: Only a thin line of hair might be visible on the back or sideways of your head.

Treatment: In this stage, the only methods through which you can restore your hairs are hair bonding or replacement with weaving technique.

Though all the recommended treatment for different hair loss stages may differ from patient to patient, so before opting for a solution it would be best to consult the hair transplant surgeon.